Club Industry is part of the divisionName Division of Informa PLC

This site is operated by a business or businesses owned by Informa PLC and all copyright resides with them. Informa PLC's registered office is 5 Howick Place, London SW1P 1WG. Registered in England and Wales. Number 8860726.

New cancer-fitness study Photo by westend61 / Getty Images.
The American Cancer Society estimates that 142,670 Americans will die from lung cancer in 2019, while 51,020 will die from colorectal cancer.

Exercise Can Reduce One's Risk of Developing Bowel or Lung Cancer by More Than 60 Percent

Researchers from the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine found that subjects with the highest fitness levels reduced their likelihood of developing lung cancer by as much as 73 percent. Similarly, the most-active subjects also reduced their likelihood of developing colorectal cancer by as much as 68 percent.

Exercise's role in reducing various health risks is well documented, but a recent study claims that regular physical activity can reduce one's risk of developing lung or bowel cancer by more than 60 percent.

"Cardiorespiratory Fitness and Incident Lung and Colorectal Cancer in Men and Women," recently published via the Wiley Online Library, studied 43,143 Americans who participated in exercise stress tests over an 18-year period. The subjects ranged from age 40 to age 70 (with a median age of 54) and were generally diverse—46 percent female, 54 percent male, 64 percent white, 29 percent African-American and 1 percent Latino.

Researchers from the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine found that those with the highest fitness levels reduced their likelihood of developing lung cancer by as much as 73 percent. Similarly, the most-active subjects also reduced their likelihood of developing colorectal cancer by as much as 68 percent.

The study states: "In what to the best of our knowledge is the largest study of its kind to date and the first to involve women and a large percentage of non-white patients, we observed that a higher level of [cardiorespiratory fitness] is independently associated with a decreased risk of lung and colorectal cancer and a lower risk of death after the diagnosis of lung and colorectal cancer in men and women compared with those with low [cardiorespiratory fitness]."

In the study, the researchers call for additional research to determine whether the associations found in their study are applicable to the general population.

The American Cancer Society estimates that 142,670 Americans will die from lung cancer in 2019, while 51,020 will die from colorectal cancer.

Hide comments

Comments

  • Allowed HTML tags: <em> <strong> <blockquote> <br> <p>

Plain text

  • No HTML tags allowed.
  • Web page addresses and e-mail addresses turn into links automatically.
  • Lines and paragraphs break automatically.
Publish