The 2016 plan expanded its focus by adding two new societal sectors in recognition of updated information on areas that provide the best opportunity to create a national culture that supports physically active lifestyles Photo by Thinkstock

The 2016 plan expanded its focus by adding two new societal sectors in recognition of updated information on areas that provide the best opportunity to create a national culture that supports physically active lifestyles. (Photo by Thinkstock.)

U.S. National Physical Activity Plan Alliance Adds Faith-Based Settings, Sport Sectors to Updated Plan

The 2016 National Physical Activity Plan builds on the initial roadmap released in 2010 and includes a set of policies, programs and initiatives designed to increase activity in all segments of the American population. 

The non-profit U.S. National Physical Activity Plan Alliance (NPAPA) this month released an updated roadmap detailing specific actions that encourage all Americans to participate in regular physical activity.

The 2016 National Physical Activity Plan builds on the initial roadmap released in 2010 and includes a set of policies, programs and initiatives designed to increase activity in all segments of the American population. The plan's ultimate purpose is to improve health, prevent disease and disability, and enhance the quality of life.

"Because of this public-private initiative, we are multiple steps closer to our initial vision: one day, all Americans will be physically active, and they will live, work and play in environments that encourage and support regular physical activity," Russell Pate, chairman, NPAPA, said in a statement.

The 2016 plan expanded its focus by adding two new societal sectors in recognition of updated information on areas that provide the best opportunity to create a national culture that supports physically active lifestyles. Faith-based settings and sport sectors were added to the existing list of business and industry; community recreation; fitness and parks; education; health care; mass media; public health; and transportation, land use and community design sectors.

NPAPA organizational partners include the American College of Sport Medicine, American Council on Exercise (ACE), American Heart Association, American Physical Therapy Association, American Medical Association, National Athletic Trainers Association, and National Strength and Conditioning Association.

"It's incredibly exciting to have played a role in creating a plan that unites actionable, grassroots-level strategies and tactics to evidence-based knowledge, in order to help create a vibrant culture of physical activity among Americans across all socio-demographic groups," Scott Goudeseune, president and CEO of ACE, said in a statement.

Goudeseune, who also serves on the NPAPA board, said the plan aligns with ACE's mission and many of the initiatives undertaken in ACE's 30-year history. ACE will be analyzing, prioritizing and developing action plans for plan strategies that are in alignment with its mission, with a focus on ACE's recent activities, including:

  • The promotion of shared use for professional-led physical activity and development of community empowerment partnerships
  • Efforts to engage with healthcare-related organizations and integrate ACE professionals into the healthcare continuum
  • Partnerships with state and local health departments in order to improve outcome tracking, promote access to evidence-based physical activity-related services and reduce health disparities
  • The promotion of a more physically active workplace through a multi-level strategic plan

"We know there is no silver bullet to the physical inactivity epidemic that is contributing to a number of chronic medical conditions and health problems in our country today, but we believe this plan will be a driving force in keeping the momentum moving forward as we all work together for a more physically active and healthier culture in America," Cedric X. Bryant, chief science officer at ACE, said in a statement.

TAGS: Wellness
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