Personal Trainers Are Required to Hold More Certifications Than Yoga, Pilates and Group Instructors

Ninety percent of personal trainers are expected to have CPR and first aid training, and approximately 50 percent are expected to complete at least one industry-recognized certifying program.

The majority of American health club employees are required to hold at least one industry-recognized certification, but what specifically is expected from various trainer types?

IHRSA's 2018 U.S. Fitness Professional Outlook report states that personal trainers, on average, are required to complete more training and hold more certifications than yoga, Pilates and group exercise instructors. Ninety percent of personal trainers are expected to hold CPR and first aid training, and approximately 50 percent are expected to complete at least one industry-recognized certifying program.

The certifications that the survey notes as being industry-recognized included but were not restricted to certifications from the Aerobics and Fitness Association of America (AFAA), the American Council on Exercise (ACE), the American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM) and the National Academy of Sports Medicine (NASM). The report noted that more than half of the clubs that participated in the report's study required personal trainers and group exercise instructors to earn a certification from ACE.

College degrees rank relatively low on the list of requirements for all trainer types, but highest for yoga and Pilates instructors.

Click through this gallery for a breakdown of the average requirements (based on percentages) for each trainer type.

For findings from this study about trainer salaries, click here. For findings on health club offerings to employees related to health insurance, click here.

For the complete IHRSA report, click here.

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