Fitness professionals continue to consider potential positive and negative implications of marijuana entering the health club world Photo by Thinkstock

Fitness professionals continue to consider potential positive and negative implications of marijuana entering the health club world. (Photo by Thinkstock.)

Denver Yoga Studio to Seek Marijuana-Usage Permit

After the passage of a public consumption ordinance in Denver, the owner of The Rhythm Revolution will seek a city permit that will allow its clients to consume cannabis at the yoga studio.

With the passage of Ordinance 300, permits will soon allow people in Denver to consume cannabis at non-food-related businesses around the city.

The owner of the yoga and group cycling studio The Rhythm Revolution plans to apply for a permit, according to a report by 9 News. The permit will cost $1,000 and will be valid for as long as the neighborhood's community association allows. The city is still fine-tuning the application of the ordinance—an unprecedented first step for marijuana public consumption laws in the United States.

Owner Jasmine Anderson told 9 News that she is interested in marijuana's sensory-enhancing qualities and how they could be incorporated into the studio's offerings.

"When we talk about tapping into the senses, using cannabis as an extra add-on could potentially heighten the sensory experience," she told 9 News. "I'm absolutely a supporter of that."

Marijuana’s application in a health and wellness context has been pondered since states first began socially legalizing the drug in 2012. Notably, 420 Games Founder Jim McAlpine has partnered with former NFL star Ricky Williams to open Power Plant Fitness in San Francisco sometime next year. The club will utilize cannabis as a supplement for focus and recovery, McAlpine told Tech Insider.

Contrarily, fitness professionals have also acknowledged some of the contradictions between exercise and marijuana use. In a Nov. 8 blog post, Pete McCall of the American Council on Exercise (ACE) noted that marijuana use causes issues such as drowsiness, stimulated appetite and slowed motor skills.

Like other substances such as alcohol, nicotine or caffeine, consuming too much marijuana could have negative health consequences and be a reason why a client may not be achieving his or her fitness goals,” he said.

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